Monday, October 23, 2017
 

Nice Home Mortgage Loan photos

A few nice home mortgage loan images I found:

Image from page 821 of “Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine” (1920)
home mortgage loan
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Identifier: baltimoreohioemp11balt
Title: Baltimore and Ohio employees magazine
Year: 1920 (1920s)
Authors: Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company Baltimore and Ohio Railroad Company
Subjects: Railroads — Employees — Periodicals Railroads — United States — Employees
Publisher: [Baltimore, Baltimore and Ohio Railroad]
Contributing Library: University of Maryland, College Park
Digitizing Sponsor: LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation

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paid not less than five per cent, on depositsand has accumulated a reasonable surplus fund. This Feature loans money to em-ployes on first mortgages on real estate only, at reasonable .-ates and liberal termsof repayment. Deposits Made The total deposits made in the Savings Department fromAugust i, 1882, toOctober 31, 1923, have been ,801,560.11. Interest Paia OutThe total interest paid on savings during the same period has been ,343^11.11. Average Rate of InterestThe average rate of interest paid per annum is 5%. Loans Granted From August i, 1882, to October 31,1923, there have been 25,050 loans grantedto build, purchase and improve homes and to release liens. Value of Homes BuiltThe approximate gross value of homes purchased or built through the ReliefDepartment is ,000,000.00. Further InformationMay be obtained by writing Relief Department, Baltimore and Ohio R. R.,Baltimore, Md., or visiting the office in Baltimore. Baltimore and Ohio Magazine, January, IQ24 orS Hirn Table

Text Appearing After Image:
Baltimore and Ohio Magazine Office: Mt. Royal Station, Baltimore, Md. , Robert M. Van Sant, EditorMargaret Talbott Stevens, Associate EditorM. W. Jones, Assistant EditorCharles H. Dickson, Art EditorHerbert D. Stitt, Staff ArtistGeorge B. Luckey, Staff Photographer Christmas on the Raikoad Christmas never comes but that it brings to thereceptive soul new beauties which make the picture oflife unfolded day by day more attractive and helpful. This year it was my good fortune to attend twoChristmas get-togethers held in Baltimore, one inthe Office of the General Freight Claim Agent and theother in the Office of the Auditor of Freight Claims, andI could not help but think during these experiences, ofthe influence such occasions must have in the everydaywork of the employes of these and the other departmentswhich enjoy the same fraternal and friendly spirit.Getting together and singing such impressive andbeautiful songs as Holy Night, Adeste Fidelis andthe other hymns and carols which so j

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Credit Card Debt Reduction Tips: 3 Great Ways to Save Big

If you are suffering from credit card debt, you’re not alone. Credit card debt is growing at an alarming rate, as more and more people find their balances getting larger and larger. But you really can achieve significant debt reduction by following some very simple strategies.

The problem, of course, with credit card debt is that interest can accumulate rapidly. This can result in larger monthly bills, which can lead to late payments, which in turn can result in even higher interest rates.

This spiral can quickly get out of control. The key to achieving credit card debt reduction is to break this spiral and begin to pay down your debt. The following are three ways to do just that.

1. Never Pay a Credit Card Late Fee

Late fees have been increasing by leaps and bounds lately, and grace periods having been getting shorter and shorter. Make sure you always pay at least your minimum payment on time. If you are absolutely unable to pay even that, then call your credit card bank and alert them. You might be able to buy yourself some time.

If you are late with even a single payment by as little as a day, there is a very good chance the bank will raise your interest rate, often by 50% or even more. Over time, this can can add up to charges far more significant than the 30 or 40 dollar late fee.

If you do miss a payment, then make sure and call your bank as soon as possible afterwards. Many banks will waive the fee if you asks them to, especially if you have a valid excuse (like you were ill or out of town). But in any case, get them to waive the fee, for this will most likely spare you from having your interest date raised and possibly save you hundreds of dollars or more.

2. Get Your Credit Card Interest Rate Lowered

If your credit card interest rate is too high, call your bank and ask them to lower it. Odds are, you could find a lower rate elsewhere, and your bank knows this. So call their bluff. Tell them you can get or have been offered a lower rate, and ask them to match that rate. If they refuse, all you have lost is a phone call. But if your request is reasonable (don’t ask them to drop your rate to %5), there is a very good chance they will lower your rate.

3. Get a New Credit Card

If your bank refuses to lower your rate, simply search for a lower rate card and transfer your balance. There are plenty of banks out there eager to accept balance transfers. Furthermore, even if you have made some late payments, thus causing your rates to rise, the odds are your credit rating hasn’t been affected. Banks usually alert credit bureaus when payments are significantly late (by like 30-60 days). If your credit rating remains unscathed, there should be nothing stopping you from finding a card with a lower rate and saving lots of money in the process.

If you utilize one or all of these methods, make sure you use any money you save to pay down the balance on your cards. Pay off as much of your balance as you can, and in no time, you will be free from the burden of credit card debt.

Scott Russell is a writer, consultant, and editor of debtconquest.com, where you can find information on credit card debt elimination, bankruptcy help, and debt relief strategies.

More Credit Card Interest Rate Articles

 

Image from page 14 of “The Lee mansion, what it was and what it is” (1911)

A few nice home loan images I found:

Image from page 14 of “The Lee mansion, what it was and what it is” (1911)
home loan
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Identifier: leemansionwhatit01tutt
Title: The Lee mansion, what it was and what it is
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Tutt, Hannah. [from old catalog]
Subjects: Lee mansion, Marblehead, Mass. [from old catalog]
Publisher: Boston, Printed by C. B. Webster & co.
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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BACK CHAMBER, THIRD FLOOR12

Text Appearing After Image:
GUEST CHAMBER, THIRD FLOOR FRONT later occupants of the house carrying out the same hospitable ideas as theoriginal owners. What the mansion was in the days of the Lees, it practically is today inbuild, if not in purpose. Across its antique portico still falls the shadows of the elms, while itsbroad freestone steps have been worn smooth with the tread of many feet, someon business intent, others to view the old mansion, for scarcely a visitor toMarblehead has been allowed to depart without this inspection. On May 9, 1898, the Marblehead Historical Society was organized, itsmembers being the trustees past and present of Abbot Public Library. Its firstcollection was placed in the library. In August, 1899, its first loan exhibitionwas held, and a wealth of articles of rare historic value was brought out fromthe homes of the town, many of them brought from foreign ports, by the mer-chant men of the town, and held as treasures by their descendants. When theexhibition ended, so many of thes

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Image from page 85 of “International studio” (1897)
home loan
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Identifier: internationalstu64newy
Title: International studio
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors:
Subjects: Art Decoration and ornament
Publisher: New York
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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llow in time. There was this year nothing ofthe experimental character markedly present in some of the Societys recent exhibitions. Ofthe loan works the most important were Mr.Ambrose McEvoys beautiful portrait of MissAsquith, Mr. Augustus Johns Smiling Womanand his Portrait of Mr. William Nicholson, andMr. Walter Sickerts LEnnni. There were alsothe late Mr J. M. Swans The Cold North, Mr.William Strangs The Buffet, and the late Mr.Robert Nobles large picture of East Linton, theLothian village where the artist lived and paintedduring the greater part of his art career. Thispicture has been acquired by the Burgh of Lintonas a memorial, and is an excellent example ofhis conscientious and often inspired work. The President, Mr. Robert Home, had for hisprincipal picture a view of Northern Edinburghwith the Firth of Forth in the distance, afavourite subject, but on this occasion realizedwith a fuller beauty of colour, tenderness oftreatment, and sense of atmosphere than ever 73 Studio- Talk

Text Appearing After Image:
butterflies (Society of Scottish Artists) BY JOHN MEXZIES heretofore. Mr. Charles Mackies spring land-scape in its effulgence of warm colour somewhatbelied its title, but that is a subsidiary matter.Mr. Henderson Tarbets Glen Ogle, his mostambitiously planned work, disclosed some ex-cellent painting in the sky and distance, butthe middle distance was overaccentuated inthe lighting effects. Mr. George Smith, mostknown by his animal studies, showed twolandscapes in which the influence of Clausenwas strongly manifest, and Mr. Robert Burnsexhibited a twilight scene scholarly in designand fascinating in the quality of its colour. Mr.John Menzies, who revels in the rich greens ofsummer, made a decided advance this year inButterflies, the name given to a decorativelydesigned study of trees ; Mr. Robert Hope isdeveloping the landscape side of his art andshowed a clever Linton pastoral. Mr. MasonHunters chief contribution was a sunny ren-dering of a Peeblesshire valley, and Mr. W. M.Frazer had

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Image from page 333 of “The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men” (1897)
home loan
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Identifier: storyofamericanh00wall
Title: The story of American heroism; thrilling narratives of personal adventures during the great Civil war, as told by the medal winners and roll of honor men
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Wallace, Lew, 1827-1905
Subjects: United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Personal narratives
Publisher: Springfield, O., J.W. Jones
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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gainst a treeon the side of a craggymountain in the hills of Penn-sylvania, nearly two thousandmiles from home, with deathstanding before me. Thereader can better imaginethan I can tell the feelings1 had. While in that conditiona straggling Federal soldierwalked up to me, looked at the stars on my collar, took ott my hat and putit on his own head, and said, Give me your arms. No, sir, I replied, I cant do that. He stepped back, raised his gun,and repeated, Give me your arms. I said, Why, my good fellow, are you a Federal soldier and dont kncnvthat you have not the right to disarm an officer? The honest soldier looked confused and said, What shall 1 do then witliyou? I told him that he ought to take me to an officer as nearly of my rankas might be. But, said he, you are not able to walk. I then told himhe ought to go and find some officer, and bring him to me. He went away, and in a little time returned to me with a gentlemanwho introduced himself as Colonel Rice of the 44th New York.*

Text Appearing After Image:
Passing the Canteen. ♦The writer jirobablj iilhuics to Colonel Etimund Ripe, lieutennnt-polonel of the Ilith Miissnchusetts Volunteers,who led his own regiment and the c»ne mentioned, the 44th New York, in tin- eluir^e nuule to close the Rap in theFederal lines, and repel Picketts assault. Colonel Kice won on that day a medal of honor, and fui-ther mention ofhim will be found in the following chapter. AMERICAN HEROISM. 317 After a few kind remarks, and expi-essing the hope that my hurt was notmortal. Colonel Rice said: Colonel, it becomes my duty to ask you for yourarms. I said, Certainly, sir. and handed him my sword and pistol,remarking to him that I had got but a short loan of that sword when the 14thAlabama captured it a few days previously from the lieutenant-colonel of the22nd ]\Iaine. and had given it to me two days before. Colonel Rice then directed the soldier who had brought him to me to goto the line and bring a litter, and meantime entertained me with kindconversation.

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Totally Free Credit Tracking – No-cost Credit Score

http://www.christianmoney.com Getting no-cost credit monitoring plus credit score for free without joining an endeavor membership. Full article from Jim Paris http://blog.christianmoney.com/2013/09/free-credit-monitoring-no-trial-membership-required.html
Video Rating: / 5

Within movie we contrast 3 credit monitoring services that currently occur available. See http://www.bestcreditreports.com/ to find out more.

 

Credit Diva’s Brand New Credit Fix Series!!!

Welcome straight back every person!!! Credit Diva here with some interesting news about the brand new credit show called, “Your Credit lifetime…Get it Right!”, which will start on Wednesday, January 20th, 2016. You will have 1 educational movie published any Wednesday for 10 days directly. I am more than excited to carry you these records so that you can reach finally your credit goals!! See you on Wednesday!!!!!

 

Life of home financing Loan Officer

This is considering genuine events

steps to make a hard and fast Rate Loan/Mortgage Calculator in Excel

http://www.TeachMsOffice.com
This movie guide will show you how to make a set price loan or home loan calculator in excel. It is really simple to accomplish and after viewing this step-by-step instance and walk-through, it is possible to produce yours in addition. This tutorial utilizes the PMT() function to determine the mandatory repayments which is additionally explained in tutorial.

To follow along with the spreadsheet noticed in the tutorial or even to get some no-cost excel macros or guidelines & tricks, go directly to the site:

http://www.TeachMsOffice.com