Friday, April 28, 2017
 

Image from page 302 of “Mutton birds and other birds” (1914)

A few nice identity thieves images I found:

Image from page 302 of “Mutton birds and other birds” (1914)
identity thieves
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Identifier: muttonbirdsother00guth
Title: Mutton birds and other birds
Year: 1914 (1910s)
Authors: Guthrie-Smith, H. (Herbert), 1861-1940
Subjects: Birds — New Zealand
Publisher: Christchurch, N.Z. : Whitcombe and Tombs
Contributing Library: American Museum of Natural History Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Biodiversity Heritage Library

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Text Appearing Before Image:
moral, even sacerdotal, thanthe twinkle or wink tipped by a kneeer, worked at a fair speed,—say a tenth or fifteenth of a second. The curtsy requires a tem-porary stoppage of progression; my kneeer can be winked at awalk. Its greeting will supersede the bow. The Ocydrome neckerwill appeal more to the demi-monde, actresses, and the Smart Set, andhas its own sjjecial advantages. It can be made completely to hide itswearers identity, it can delay arrest, and the striking appearanceof the garment when fully extended into space will prove invalu-able for purposes of advertisement. A procession of ten thousandsuffragettes, their skirts telescoped and set at time, marchingroped together through the streets of a great city would providethat toucli of earnestness and quiet determination that hitherto hasperhaps been lacking. One word more—the proceeds of the sale of the Ocydrome skirtwill be entirely devoted to the more efficient ranging of ourSanctuaries and Forest Eeserves. PLATE LXIII.

Text Appearing After Image:
Stewart Island Weka about to examine debris of Kiwis nest. AND OTHER BIRDS 157 and my handkerchief of just the fit IsabeUa<jolour substituted; it was wrapped up verytight, squeezed into a rough ovoid, and, withthe smooth exterior upwards, carefully placedin the nest. Leask, McLean, and myself thenwatched the return of the marauders. At firstthey were a little suspicious at the absence ofmissile and threat. Then, in spite of themonitory gesticulations of the Penguins head,and the uneasy swaying and shufflings of hisponderous body, one of them drew more andmore near to the nest. Assuming a pose con-venient for instant flight, and stretching hisneck forward to its fullest length, the blow wasdealt, the lens had registered the deed. In thefulness of their joy McLean and Leask rushedmetaphorically into each others arms, whilstI, metaphorically, choked and blew my nose withmy fingers—the handkerchief was gone—in anaccess of emotion no pride could restrain. Theflight of the thief had

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from page 49 of “S.D. Butcher’s pioneer history of Custer County : and short sketches of early days in Nebraska” (1901)
identity thieves
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Identifier: sdbutcherspionee00butc
Title: S.D. Butcher’s pioneer history of Custer County : and short sketches of early days in Nebraska
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Butcher, Solomon D. (Solomon Devore), 1856-1927
Subjects: Frontier and pioneer life
Publisher: Broken Bow, Neb. : [Merchants Pub. Co.]
Contributing Library: The Library of Congress
Digitizing Sponsor: Sloan Foundation

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in thesame line of business, had suffered heavy losses from the depredations ofcattle thieves. For this reason he became the prime mover in an attempt todrive the cattle thieves from the country. Olive resided in Plum Creek.Dawson county, but his ranch was on the South Loup river, about four mileseast of the present town of Callaway. While in a general way he was a goodsort of man, and very generous and courteous to those with whom he was ongood terms, he was an implacable enemy and an adept in the use of firearms.His brother, Kobert Olive, was a bad man w^hen aroused. Bob Olive had pre-viously killed several men in Texas, and to conceal his identity had assumedthe name of Stevens and tlown to Nebraska, where his brother L P. hadalready established a ranch, and it was under the name of Stevens that hewas known during his career in Custer county. A short time previous to theevents which led up to the killing of Bob Olive, or Stevens, one Manley Capel 44 PIONEER HISTORY OF CUSTER COUNTY

Text Appearing After Image:
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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original work.

 

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